Showing posts with label plasma-lyte. Show all posts
Showing posts with label plasma-lyte. Show all posts

Thursday, October 17, 2019

Fluid Resuscitation of Trauma Patients: 0.9%NaCl (saline) or Plasma-lyte?

I am not a trauma surgeon. I am not a trauma physician. I do not take care of trauma patients in my current practice. I did several rotations in the trauma intensive care unit during my fellowship training but by know means am I going to pretend to have the knowledge that my colleagues who do that every day have. The study I am going to be discussing today is a pilot study.

The authors were concerned about the metabolic acidosis that occurs from the elevated chloride concentrations in 0.9% NaCl which is 154mmol/L. Remember, reference values in the lab for chloride levels are between 98 and 109mmol/L. Also, there is data suggesting that an increase in chloride levels by just 5mmol/L could have deleterious effects on our patients. This hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis is not something new, we've known about its effects on the kidneys for decades now. I guess we've just been ignoring it.

I am a fan of whole blood to resuscitate trauma patients, but I my knowledge on the matter is weak. At the time being, patients receive a significant amount of crystalloids for resuscitation. The authors chose to use NS and plasma-lyte due to the fact that lactated ringers is contraindicated with blood products as it allows the blood to coagulate as it goes in due to the calciums effect on citrate.

Surgeons are trained, from my experience, to focus on base excess. When a patient you're taking care of them is sick, and you're giving them a call to give them the heads up of what's going on, one of the first questions you need to be prepared to answer is "what is the base deficit"? Plasma-lyte is a balanced salt solution that I have reviewed numerous times on instagram, my website, and youtube. Plenty of resources out there from me explaining this fluid. This focus on base excess is why they made this

They ended up with 46 patients enrolled in the study.

Plasma-lyte corrected the base deficit faster than 0.9% NaCl. Primary outcome achieved. Patients reached and remained in their normal acid-base physiology longer.

They also found that 0.9% NaCl leads to hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis, decreased serum bicarb levels, and worse base deficit.

Patients also had increased urine output with plasma-lyte compared to saline solution. There is some concern about whether gluconate causes some sort of increased urine production but this is not specified in this paper.

Some institutions worry about the added cost of plasma-lyte, which is approximately $1 on top of the cost of NS or LR depending on the institution and their contract. This study showed that providing plasma-lyte kept serum magnesium levels closer to normal (p=0.007). If you are a bean counter, you could potentially save some money by using plasma-lyte due to less cost of magnesium replacement. I may be stretching a bit but at least I am admitting that I'm stretching. The patients needed about 4gm of Mg in the NS group and no replacement in the PL group. I take back the part of me stretching. The authors state that the difference at their institution of cost between NS and PL is $0.76. 2gm of magnesium is $5.19. That means that PL may end up saving money and additional testing.

All in all, this is a pilot study. I have not personally seen the actual study. If you all have, feel free to correct me. This is not a full free article, unfortunately.

-EJ








Link to Abstract

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Saturday, September 28, 2019

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: PlasmaLyte vs. 0.9% Sodium Chloride for Resuscitation

Can we start looking at our diabetic ketoacidosis protocols and changing them? This study from 2012 is admittedly small, retrospective, and leaves a lot to be desired. But their findings are significant in my opinion. Usually studies need large sample sizes to prove their endpoints. Here, the endpoints were proved (within their methodology) with this small sample size. The article is not free and I bet that more people would benefit from the knowledge one could gain from it if it wasn't hidden behind the paywall. Grrrrrrr. Here are the benefits of using plasmalyte over saline.
1. the mean arterial pressure was improved in the PL group p less than 0.05
2. there was improved urine output in the PL group in the first 4-6 hours p less than 0.05
3. the patients who received NS had higher potassium levels than the PL group between the 6-12 hour mark. Remember, PL has 5meq/L of K while NS has ZERO. Can we drop this hyperkalemia with LR and PL nonsense already?
They disclose the COST of plasma-lyte in Australia to be $1.94/L vs. $1.17/L of NS. It's not $30 a liter like I've heard in the past. This was in 2012.
Okay, this is a short one. I need to go. My wife wants us to enjoy our Saturday and for me to not be such a nerd reading articles.
BYE!
- EJ



Link to Abstract

Although great care has been taken to ensure that the information in this post is accurate, eddyjoemd, LLC shall not be held responsible or in any way liable for the continued accuracy of the information, or for any errors, omissions or inaccuracies, or for any consequences arising therefrom.

The primary source of compensation I receive for this page and Instagram work is via Amazon Affiliates. All this free education you receive is much out of the kindness of my heart but I also like to receive a check every month from Affiliate Marketing. No one likes to work for free. The best part is that it's of no cost to you. Here's how it works. 

You click on the link for Will Owens' awesome ventilator book here: https://amzn.to/2myFxYm and whether or not you purchase the book I receive a small commission for whatever you buy on Amazon for the next 24 hours at no cost to you. For every copy of the Ventilator book people have bought off of my affiliate links, for example, I have earned $0.85. I know it's not big money but it helps motivate me to keep on plugging along doing this heavy lifting in Critical Care. Thank you for supporting my work! 

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Wednesday, September 25, 2019

Hyperchloremia: We've known it is harmful to the kidneys since 2012

It has been 7 years since this study came out, and many since. Here we are still using saline like it's benign. Part of the problem is that clinicians get set in their ways and just don't read. Sorry if that offends anyone, but it's true. Some say, "this has always worked and I haven't seen a problem with it" so they keep doing what they're doing. Our job is to cause no harm. I'm trying my best to minimize that but after all, we are all human. Being lazy is no excuse, though.

This article from 2012 shows a study that was performed on 12 healthy volunteers. It was a randomized, double blind, cross over study. I bet they were either college students or medical students; the mean age was 22. This was not disclosed in the article, of course. The participants received either 2L of 0.9% NaCl or plasma-lyte over an hour on separate occasions 7 to 10 days apart. If you still don't know what Plasma-lyte is, you must be new here. They did some bloodwork as well as MRI's. They must have had some good funding here.


Amongst the results, they found a significant difference in the serum chloride, as expected (p < 0.0001) and a much lower strong ion difference (p = 0.025) in the saline group. All the other electrolytes were unremarkable. From the MRI results, they found lower mean renal artery flow velocity (p = 0.045) and lower renal cortical tissue perfusion (p = 0.008) in the saline group. This proves that hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis is not benign.

A hat tip to the authors.

-EJ




Link to the article: 

Chowdhury AH, Cox EF, Francis ST, et al. A Randomized, controlled, double-blind crossover study on the effects of 2-L infusions of 0.9% saline and plasma-lyte 148 on renal blood flow velocity and renal cortical tissue perfusion in healthy volunteers. Ann Surg 2012; 256: 18–24.

Although great care has been taken to ensure that the information in this post is accurate, eddyjoemd, LLC shall not be held responsible or in any way liable for the continued accuracy of the information, or for any errors, omissions or inaccuracies, or for any consequences arising therefrom.

The primary source of compensation I receive for this page and Instagram work is via Amazon Affiliates. All this free education you receive is much out of the kindness of my heart but I also like to receive a check every month from Affiliate Marketing. No one likes to work for free. The best part is that it's of no cost to you. Here's how it works. 

You click on the link for Will Owens' awesome ventilator book here: https://amzn.to/2myFxYm and whether or not you purchase the book I receive a small commission for whatever you buy on Amazon for the next 24 hours at no cost to you. For every copy of the Ventilator book people have bought off of my affiliate links, for example, I have earned $0.85. I know it's not big money but it helps motivate me to keep on plugging along doing this heavy lifting in Critical Care. Thank you for supporting my work! 
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Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Using Balanced Salt Solutions instead of 0.9% Sodium Chloride

We all know the order sets for DKA, a bunch of 0.9% NaCl first boluses then drip, insulin drip, replace electrolytes, glucose gets to a certain number, change the fluids to 0.9% NaCl that contains dextrose, wait for the anion gap to close, give long acting insulin, wait a bit, turn off the drip, discharge planning. It's simple stuff, really. I may have oversimplified it but you know exactly what the protocol is at your facility. Truth is, though, is that the best for these sick patients? Would they do better with lactated ringers or plasma-lyte?

This study from 2011 states that there are 100,000 hospitalizations for DKA annually in the US. They knew from prior literature that using a bunch of saline solution causes a hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis. They wanted to see if it would happen in this patient population. They conducted a randomized double blind study providing these patients with either 0.9% NaCl solution or Plasma-lyte. For those of you who do not know what plasma-lyte is, go check out my YouTube videos (/shameless plug). They used their typical DKA protocol for their institution which is described in the article.

The study took 24 months and they ended up with 23 patients in the "normal saline" group and 22 patients in the plasma-lyte group. It was entertaining to see that at baseline, before a drop of fluid was even given, the serum chloride of the saline group was less than the PL group: 94 vs 98 (p=0.027). When the study was said and done, however, the chloride level was 111 in the NS group and 105 in the PL group (p < 0.001). I don't know if you've had time to look at the older things I've written/posted but there's a particular study that comes to mind where the authors found that an increase in serum chloride by 5 increases your chances of developing acute kidney injury. There was also a significant difference in the serum bicarb level where the NS group has a bicarb increase of 7 whereas the PL group had an increase of 9 (p=0.023). The authors did not follow renal function in these patients from what I am able to see. The authors admitted that they didn't know what the clinical significance of all this is. I believe we have data now with more recent studies to show us what the clinical significance actually is.

- EJ



Link to Abstract

Mahler SA, Conrad SA, Wang H, et al. Resuscitation with balanced electrolyte solution prevents hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. Am J Emerg Med 2011; 29: 670–674.

Although great care has been taken to ensure that the information in this post is accurate, eddyjoemd, LLC shall not be held responsible or in any way liable for the continued accuracy of the information, or for any errors, omissions or inaccuracies, or for any consequences arising therefrom.

The primary source of compensation I receive for this page and Instagram work is via Amazon Affiliates. All this free education you receive is much out of the kindness of my heart but I also like to receive a check every month from Affiliate Marketing. No one likes to work for free. The best part is that it's of no cost to you. Here's how it works. 

You click on the link for Will Owens' awesome ventilator book here: https://amzn.to/2myFxYm and whether or not you purchase the book I receive a small commission for whatever you buy on Amazon for the next 24 hours at no cost to you. For every copy of the Ventilator book people have bought off of my affiliate links, for example, I have earned $0.85. I know it's not big money but it helps motivate me to keep on plugging along doing this heavy lifting in Critical Care. Thank you for supporting my work! 

My Amazon Store

Monday, September 2, 2019

Does using Balanced Crystalloids vs. Saline improve mortality in sepsis?

Balanced Crystalloids Versus Saline in Sepsis: A Secondary Analysis of the SMART Trial

Sometimes we need to make minor adjustments in what we do in the ICU to see a difference. I have been going off for several years now on my instagram account as well as YouTube channel regarding the importance of utilizing balanced crystalloids such as lactated ringers or plasma-lyte and I keep on hearing "there's no mortality benefit". Well, now there's data showing that there is. I knew it was just a matter of time. It just makes sense. This analysis is a piggyback on the SMART trial performed by the good people over at Vanderbilt published last year in the NEJM. In that study and therefore this study, they looked at using saline solution versus either lactated ringers or plasma-lyte. You may be asking yourself "but I thought that study didn't show any mortality benefit". You are correct, it didn't, but that finding was regarding all critically ill patients.

This study looked at 30 day mortality in patients in the MICU who were septic. All in all, they looked at 1641 patients with the diagnosis of sepsis. Note: not necessarily septic shock. 34.1% of patients were on vasopressors and 40% were on the vent.

Here are the outcomes:
30 day mortality: 26.3% in the balanced crystalloids group vs. 31.2% in the saline group (p=0.01)
Patients who received balanced crystalloids had more days free of vasopressors, free of dialysis days, lower plasma lactate concentrations after ICU admission.
Debate settled? Well, no. But check out the article for yourself before taking my opinion as gospel.

-EJ




Link to Abstract

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Sunday, August 4, 2019

Balanced Crystalloids Versus Saline in Critically Ill Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis



Link to Abstract

I honestly wonder how much data is enough data to change some minds. This is why I am counting on you all, people who are trying to keep up with this flurry of data to the best of your ability, to go through medical school, residency, possibly fellowship with a healthy respect for 0.9% saline solution. It may seem like it's hopeless from time to time to change decades worth of practice. Heck, my first IVF resuscitation video is almost 2.5 years old and has almost 39000 views! Hopefully the studies which will be published within the upcoming 2 years will hit the nail on the head. You can see the data from the slides, using saline versus balanced salt solutions increased mortality in the critically ill, increased acute kidney injury, and kept the patients on the ventilator for a longer period of time. To those harping about the increased costs of one fluid versus the next, consider the cost of one ventilator day. Consider the risks involved with each day on the vent. Consider the financial strain from working up every-single-case of AKI. This stuff adds up, colleagues. Anyway. A hat tip to the authors! 

- EJ



Abstract Copied/Pasted from the article above. 
Background: The optimal resuscitative fluid remains controversial. 
Objective: To assess the association between crystalloid fluid and outcomes in critically ill adults. Methods: Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Scopus, PubMed, and Cochrane Central Register for Controlled Trials were searched from inception through July 2019. Cohort studies and randomized trials of critically ill adults provided predominantly nonperioperative fluid resuscitation with balanced crystalloids or 0.9% sodium chloride (saline) were included. 
Results: Thirteen studies (n = 30 950) were included. 
Balanced crystalloids demonstrated lower hospital or 28-/30-day mortality (risk ratio [RR] = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.75-0.99; I2 = 82%) overall, in observational studies (RR = 0.64; 95% CI = 0.41-0.99; I2 = 63%), and approached significance in randomized trials (RR = 0.94; 95% CI = 0.88-1.02; I2 = 0%). 
New acute kidney injury occurred less frequently with balanced crystalloids (RR = 0.91; 95% CI = 0.85-0.98; I2 = 0%), though progression to renal replacement therapy was similar (RR = 0.91; 95% CI = 0.79-1.04; I2 = 38%). 
In the sepsis cohort, odds of hospital or 28-/30-day mortality were similar, but the odds of major adverse kidney events occurring in the first 30 days were less with balanced crystalloids than saline (OR = 0.78; 95% CI = 0.66-0.91; I2 = 42%). 
Conclusion and Relevance: Resuscitation with balanced crystalloids demonstrated lower hospital or 28-/30-day mortality compared with saline in critically ill adults but not specifically those with sepsis. Balanced crystalloids should be provided preferentially to saline in most critically ill adult patients.