Showing posts with label hyperkalemia. Show all posts
Showing posts with label hyperkalemia. Show all posts

Thursday, September 19, 2019

0.9% Saline vs. Ringer's Lactate: Which one causes an increase in potassium?

Effects of Normal Saline vs. Lactated Ringer's during Renal Transplantation

0.9% saline is 154mmol/L of sodium and 154mmol/L of chloride. That's it. There's no potassium, calcium, magnesium, nor buffering agent in there. Ringer's lactate, however, has 130mmol/L of sodium, 109mmol/L of chloride, 4mmol/L of potassium, 28mmol/L of lactate, and 3mmol/L of calcium. One would expect that the solution containing potassium would cause a greater increase in potassium than the one without potassium, right? Well, not so fast. Large volumes of sodium chloride, produce a hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis. What happens during acidosis? Well, there's a shift of potassium from the intracellular space to the extra cellular space. Much of this has to do with the strong ion difference which I will be breaking down in the near future. In this study, 52 patients patients received either LR or NS during their renal transplants.

Here are the findings: This has been copied and pasted from the article. Please download it and read it for yourself.

"Patients in the NS group had a lower mean PH level during the transplantation compared with those who received LR (p < 0. 001).

Mean serum potassium levels in the NS and LR groups were 4.88 ± 0.7 and 4.03 ± 0.8 meq/L, respectively (p < 0.001).

Mean changes of the serum potassium were +0.5 ± 0.6 meq/L in the NS group and –0.5 ± 0.9 meq/L in the LR group (p < 0.001).

Mean changes of PH were −0.06 ± 0.05 in the NS group and –0.005 ± 0.07 in the LR group (p < 0.001)"

If next time someone tells you that LR causes hyperkalemia, you can be armed with data. I have other articles with similar results that I plan on sharing in the upcoming days.

I don't know what to make of that thrombosis phenomenon they found. Must keep an eye out for more data regarding that.






Mohammad Reza Khajavi, Farhad Etezadi, Reza Shariat Moharari, Farsad Imani, Ali Pasha Meysamie, Patricia Khashayar & Atabak Najafi (2008) Effects of Normal Saline vs. Lactated Ringer's during Renal Transplantation, Renal Failure, 30:5, 535-539

Link to Abstract

Link to FREE PDF


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Sunday, July 14, 2019

Management of hyperkalemia in patients with kidney disease: a position paper endorsed by the Italian Society of Nephrology



Link to Abstract
Full Free PDF

#hyperkalemia, a daily issue for the #intensivist#emergencymedicine docs, and #nephrologist. It’s really not that hard to manage once you check your own pulse. This tasty little algorithm definitely puts the adrenaline in check after you see that number called in as a critical from the lab and shows up glowing red on your computer screen telling you to just do something! A 🎩 tip to the authors. 

-EJ

Monday, April 8, 2019

Hyperkalemia Management in the Acutely Ill






Hyperkalemia, that dreaded page at 4am that makes our hearts race and we rush to our EMR where we click every single order on the order set. We should really be better at getting an EKG on ourselves and thinking through the whole process. Is the sample hemolyzed? Is the patient already on CRRT and the bath needs to be changed? The authors did a great job with the algorithm which we all should have a copy of on our phones.

Link to Abstract

Full FREE PDF!

Dépret, F., Peacock, W. F., Liu, K. D., Rafique, Z., Rossignol, P., & Legrand, M. (2019). Management of hyperkalemia in the acutely ill patient. Annals of Intensive Care, 9(1).

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