Showing posts with label cordis. Show all posts
Showing posts with label cordis. Show all posts

Monday, September 30, 2019

Cordis vs MAC Introducer: What is the difference between the two?

This is a topic better handled by Surgeons than myself but I haven't seen anyone do it. Here I go! @buckparker, you're invited to chime in at this party, bud. @physiciandoodles inspired me to create this post.

Quick! This patient needs to be resuscitated with blood STAT! Call for the massive transfusion protocol and grab me a Cordis STAT! Do you know what this means? Do you know what it means if they asked for an introducer? For many years I was confused myself. I mean, aren't they both just large bore central lines for the purpose of infusion blood quickly or floating a central line? Well yes, they are. But depending on what institution you work at, you may get a funny look on your face if you ask for it by the non-standard name. Non-standard for that institution, of course. I will make this clear, though, as I posted this earlier in the life of my instagram page. You can get A LOT done in a massive bleed with two solid 16 gauge peripheral IVs. Many times you do not need to puny central line. But there are times when patients mean business and they needs all and a catheter of this type is necessary. Okay, let's get started.

First of all, the MAC introducer. This is a proprietary product from Arrow/Teleflex. MAC is a trademarked name that stands for multi-lumen catheter. You may say to yourself, well Eddy, a triple lumen catheter should be a MAC line too! You're not wrong, but we can't make this already challenging job easier on ourselves, right? MAC introducers can come with anywhere from one to three lumens. You could float a swan through many of them, but not all. It is essentially like a "Cordis" but it could have another line. The MAC also has the dilator in the catheter as my colleague Zahid, @zvhvd, pointed out.




A "Cordis" is also an introducer, but the word Cordis is the brand name of the product. A Cordis is the same introducer, but only has one side port. You can also float a swan through this puppy. 





There are other manufacturers who make similar products that I am not going to cover here for the sake of time. Your friendly neighborhood ICU should have one of these introducers in stock. Familiarize yourself with where it is because the day you need it, the patient NEEDS it.

- EJ

Photo credits for Arrow/Teleflex Products

Photo credits for Cordis Products

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